Resources

Follow these links to websites that will help prepare you for the Summit. These websites contain reports and data that will be referenced in the presentations and discussions.  We trust you will take some time to look them over before coming to the Summit.

STRIVE TOGETHER: EVERY CHILD. CRADLE TO CAREER.

This website will orient the Summit participant to the Cradle to Career initiative that is getting started in Washington County, MD.  The Rotary Club of Hagerstown and the Early Childhood Advisory Council are supporters and participants in this important effort that will advocate for education for each child and challenge our community to a new vision of education.
http://www.strivetogether.org/vision-roadmap
 

NEWSPAPER ARTICLES

NY Times:  This is Your Brain on Summer.
This article by Jeff Smink, published on July 27, 2011. It describes in non-technical terms what often happens to children who are not exposed to learning experiences in the summer.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/28/opinion/28smink.html

The Washington Post:  Poverty linked to brain structure in children, new research shows
This article by Lyndsey Layton, published on March 31, 2015.  Describes a provocative new study suggesting that poverty affects brain structure in children and teenagers, with children growing up in the poorest households having smaller brains than those who live in affluence.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/poverty-linked-to-brain-structure-in-children-new-research-shows/2015/03/31/25fe6f10-d7df-11e4-8103-fa84725dbf9d_story.html

The Rotarian Magazine:  Do It Yourself Libraries. The Little Free Libraries movement is sweeping the world.  It began with a vision of a Hudson, WI Rotarian.  This is his story and the story of Little Free Libraries.  It illustrates the contribution that individuals and businesses can make to promoting literacy. 
http://therotarianmagazine.com/diy-libraries/

RESEARCH PAPERS

Where Brain Science Meets Public Policy January 2015 - Strategies for Building Executive Function Skills in the Early Years. 
This report from the Institute for Child Success provides a quick yet meaningful orientation to the concepts of executive function development.
brain_science.pdf

Learning to Read:  Why Reading by the End of Third Grade Matters.
This is a seminal report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation that clearly documents the importance of children reading at grade level by the end of third grade in educational achievement terms.
http://www.aecf.org/~/media/Pubs/Initiatives/KIDS%20COUNT/123/2010KCSpecReport/AEC_report_color_highres.pdf

VIDEOS

Building Adult Capabilities to Improve Child Outcomes: A Theory of Change.  This video is from Harvard University, Center on the Developing Child, depicts a theory of change from the Frontiers of Innovation community for achieving breakthrough outcomes for vulnerable children and families. It describes the need to focus on building the capabilities of caregivers and strengthening the communities that together form the environment of relationships essential to children’s lifelong learning, health, and behavior. 
http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/multimedia/videos/theory_of_change/

Brain Architecture:  This is the first of a four part series of videos from the University of Minnesota.  This discusses the structure and development of a child’s brain.  It discusses the processes for developing and strengthening brain synapses and how it affects a child’s learning and behavior as the child grows and matures. 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_profilepage&v=SpqLzFew9bs

Pay Now or Pay Later:  This is the fourth of a four part series of videos that summarizes some of the social consequences resulting from a lack of early childhood development.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=20DdwzhMTTA&list=UUIoMTAkRGLEJFVTodRHCIIg

Get Your Child Ready to Read:  This 4 minute Youtube video urges parents that it is never too early to start reading.  It uses some literacy related language that you will hear applied at the Summit.  Such terms include print motivation, print awareness, narrative skills, vocabulary, phonological awareness, and letter knowledge.  Business can encourage employees to use these techniques with their own children, grandchildren, neighbors, or as volunteers.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uByMY-x6GcE